HTML/CSS

This academic year is my first real exposure to both HTML and CSS. I was vaguely aware of what they were prior to starting the course, but not enough to even consider myself a beginner at either. To anyone who doesn’t doesn’t know what they are, they stand for Hypertext Markup Language and Cascading Style Sheet. in basic terms, HTML let’s you put content in a website, and CSS makes it look ‘pretty’ (or as pretty as your skill allows). my CSS skill is possibly what you’d call subpar at this particular point in time, as i spend most of my time practising in HTML, which i would say is coming along fairly nicely

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 22.04.24

this is a screenshot of me adding images and links into my ‘website’. Notice how you can’t see the actual images being added. This is because this is just HTML, not the actual visible website.

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 22.04.01

in the corner is what it would actually look like. Very primitive, but theoretically and practically, it works. Also notice that there a few different opening and closing tags. The tags have to be changed based on whatever you’re putting in them. For example, when creating a list, you either use the tags <ol></ol> (ordered list), or <ul></ul> (unordered list).

HTML/CSS

D4DME: Participatory Culture

When we were first introduced to Design for Digital Media Environments (D4DME for short), we look at participatory culture and the technosocial. We basically looked at some free, open source alternatives to some proprietary software and we looked at other free software that lets users upload and edit with very few restrictions. Often, these restrictions are related to how you use and share other people’s work, and how others are able to use your work.

Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 17.21.13
an image i uploaded to wikimedia commons.

As an introduction to participatory culture, we were required contribute to a piece of software. initially, I was going to add a landmark to www.openstreetmap.org/, which is an alternative to google or apple maps that allows anybody to add something new to the map, but I wasn’t able to verify my email and had to scrap that idea. instead, I uploaded an image (see above) from my mobile onto wikimedia commons, after creating a profile. I had to agree to certain sharing terms, such as the fact that the image had to be entirely my own.

D4DME: Participatory Culture

Analysis

So, I finished the poster, and I wouldn’t say it turned out exactly as expected. Unfortunately, due to (self-inflicted) time constraints, i had to heavily condense the information involved. Personally, I believe that all the info present is accurate and fairly good, but there just doesn’t seem to be enough of it. Of course, given more time I would have definitely added more to it. Unfortunately I seemed to hit a massive block when creating the characters, and inspiration only came to me at the last minute (quite literally).

All in all I’d say I’ve pretty much hit middle ground with this poster. I’d have preferred it to be much more comprehensive, but that’s what happens when you don’t manage your time in the best way possible. oops.

As you can see, each character has a fairly unique design to make them recognisable, even from a quick glance. I wasn’t able to stop the lines overlapping, but it doesn’t take much away from the image as a whole. On the plus side, despite not having the amount of content I initially desired, there isn’t much clutter, meaning you can see and (hopefully) understand everything that’s going on with the poster (every cloud and that). Also, you can see that not every character is connected to every other character. of course this is because not every character has met all the others, or what little connection they have isn’t considered significant enough to mention. You’ll notice that there are a few branching lines. this is basically to conserve space and stop one character (like Vader) having a million lines extending everywhere.

Jean-Baptiste,-Arran--A2-Poster

Analysis

Poster Development (Stage 4)

This is basically the final stage prior to completion. It shows some of the characters models being created, and how i’ve planned them to look. I kind of wanted to eliminate blank white spaces as much as I could, so I opted to make the entire circle into the characters’ heads. Also I think it looks kind of cool. As for the connecting lines, I forgot to mention that I intended every line to be straight, as it ┬ájust looks neater, and hopefully, there will be no overlapping lines (fat chance)Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 06.06.16

Poster Development (Stage 4)

Poster Development (Stage 1)

My poster started to take form very quickly, as I had a pretty clear idea of what I wanted to do. It looks pretty standard for a poster, but the things that really give it shape such as the characters and the background haven’t been added. The lightsabers give quite a clear indication of what I’m doing, and the names of characters were just so I wouldn’t forget where I was planning to put them

Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 06.06.24

Poster Development (Stage 1)